Inverroche, a unique range of craft gins infused with fynbos from the coastal region and dunes of the Cape Floral Kingdom, is presenting a limited edition of its Classic Gin in packaging that has been specially designed to give solitary bees much-needed homes. Aptly called Inverroche Bee&Bee, the beautifully crafted boxes in which the gin is packaged are intended to be repurposed as bee hotels and to give these vital pollinators a place to nest and rest in gardens or even on balconies. 


 Inverroche Bee&Bee is a highlight of Inverroche’s ‘By Nature’ campaign, which celebrates the relationship between the brand and nature. The initiative is also aligned to the brand’s promise, which is to respect, work with and replenish the natural environment and to build an emotional connection with its audience, which is by nature pioneering and the first to create.


 “The Inverroche range, which pioneered the craft gin scene in South Africa and introduced an entirely new category into the local and international industry, brings together traditional botanicals and uniquely African notes derived from Cape fynbos,” says Lorna Scott, Founder and Creative Director. “Solitary bees play a fundamental role in the pollination of the fynbos biome and therefore in its long-term sustainability. So we want to celebrate the key role they play in making Inverroche gins unique and to give back to nature with our Bee&Bee packaging.”
 
Few people realise that not all bees are honeybees and that, in fact, 90% are solitary bees that do not sting or produce honey. They are however, one of nature’s primary pollinators and are responsible for pollinating more than a third of the world’s crops, making them important for the proper functioning of the ecosystem we all call home. 
 
Inverroche Bee&Bee is a way of supporting these solitary bees, which sadly have fewer and fewer natural nesting grounds. And because Inverroche is made by nature, it is a brand dedicated to helping nature. 
 
Partnering with Chevonne Reynolds, biodiversity researcher and founder of the Jozi Bee Hotel Project, and Phillip Hollander and Stephen Wilson from sustainable furniture company, Houtlander, the brand has created bee hotels that are craft pieces in their own right. Each Inverroche Bee&Bee box is made using invasive alien tree species and is designed to have multiple-sized holes, which mimic the holes the bees would use in nature. And these are desperately needed because, unlike honeybees, solitary bees do not live in hives and do not rely on a queen to breed, so when their natural nesting grounds disappear, so do their chances for survival.
 
“By breathing life into fynbos, bees sustain Inverroche’s home in Still Bay and bring a unique flavour to our products, so we are doing the same for them. Now gin connoisseurs who share our commitment to protecting and helping our environment can all play their part to help protect nature’s little helpers. Open your own Inverroche Bee&Bee today.” Says Sarah Mansfield, Head of Portfolio, Pernod Ricard South Africa.